Amiga Unix Wiki

Because AmigaOS just isn't obscure enough today!

User Tools

Site Tools


networking

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
networking [2022/04/15 21:54]
wiki_admin
networking [2022/04/16 18:16] (current)
wiki_admin fixed typos
Line 5: Line 5:
 With the {{http://amigaunix.com/lib/exe/fetch.php/downloads:gateway_volume_2_96043.iso.zip|Gateway UNIX CD's}} (520 MB) drivers the [[http://amiga.resource.cx/exp/ariadne|Village Tronic's Ariadne card]] also works. The Ariadne is also claimed to be 20% faster in receiving than the A2065 (presumably under AmigaOS). With the {{http://amigaunix.com/lib/exe/fetch.php/downloads:gateway_volume_2_96043.iso.zip|Gateway UNIX CD's}} (520 MB) drivers the [[http://amiga.resource.cx/exp/ariadne|Village Tronic's Ariadne card]] also works. The Ariadne is also claimed to be 20% faster in receiving than the A2065 (presumably under AmigaOS).
  
-The A2065 only has BNC (coaxial 10Base2) and an DB15 (AUI) ports. If you buy an AUI Transceiver and plug it into the AUI port, you can have RJ45 connectivity. Ardiane, being four years newer, has RJ45 on board making it easier to plug in into modern networks. Modern switches might however have issues with either board negotiating the port speed to old 10Mbps. If you have issues, you might need to set the switch ports manually or use an older 10/100Mbps hub or switch in-between.+The A2065 only has BNC (coaxial 10Base2) and an DB15 (AUI) ports. If you buy an AUI Transceiver and plug it into the AUI port, you can have RJ45 connectivity. Ardiane, being four years newer, has RJ45 on board making it easier to plug in into modern networks. Modern switches might however have issues with either board negotiating the port speed to old 10Mbps. If you have issues, you might need to set the switch ports manually or use an older 10/100Mbps hub or switch in-between.
  
 If you're into vintage networking you can also go ahead and build your own coaxial 10Base2 network! Old 10BaseT (RJ45) hubs often have an uplink port with BNC (coaxial), or you can buy media converter for BNC-to-RJ45 conversion. Old ethernet gear is usually readily available on eBay (but not always cheap). If you're into vintage networking you can also go ahead and build your own coaxial 10Base2 network! Old 10BaseT (RJ45) hubs often have an uplink port with BNC (coaxial), or you can buy media converter for BNC-to-RJ45 conversion. Old ethernet gear is usually readily available on eBay (but not always cheap).
Line 11: Line 11:
 ===== Basic installation ===== ===== Basic installation =====
  
-During the installation, you are asked if you want to configure network. Same can be done later in amixadm, it will ask you to give IP addresses and host names of the local machine and a remote machine (anything in your local network, this will be put to /etc/hosts). The IP address set here will be the IP address the machine will take during booting.+During the installation, you are asked if you want to configure network. Same can be done later in **amixadm**, it will ask you to give IP addresses and host names of the local machine and a remote machine (anything in your local network, this will be put to /etc/hosts). The IP address set here will be the IP address the machine will take during booting.
  
 You can check the status of the network and the currently used IP address with **ifconfig aen0** You can check the status of the network and the currently used IP address with **ifconfig aen0**
Line 17: Line 17:
 ===== DNS ===== ===== DNS =====
  
-Out of the box, Amiga UNIX doesn't do DNS lookups but looks at local files (/etc/hosts) only. To enable DNS access:+Out of the box, Amiga UNIX doesn't do DNS lookups but looks at local files (/etc/hosts) only. \\ 
 + 
 +To enable DNS access:
  
 <code> <code>
Line 32: Line 34:
 Place named.boot in /etc, and everything else into /var/named. Edit /etc/named.boot and replace the IP address on this line with the DNS server you use for your net connection: Place named.boot in /etc, and everything else into /var/named. Edit /etc/named.boot and replace the IP address on this line with the DNS server you use for your net connection:
  
-forwarders 192.168.1.1+**forwarders 192.168.1.1**
  
 Then start named by running in.named with no arguments. Edit the file /etc/resolv.conf to contain this line: Then start named by running in.named with no arguments. Edit the file /etc/resolv.conf to contain this line:
  
-nameserver 127.0.0.1+**nameserver 127.0.0.1**
  
 You can verify this is working by using nslookup to find google.com's IP: You can verify this is working by using nslookup to find google.com's IP:
Line 69: Line 71:
 telnet 192.168.0.44 telnet 192.168.0.44
  
-If backspace doesn't work over the remote session (produces chracaters instead of deleting), fix it by typing stty erase (backspace)+If backspace doesn't work over the remote session (produces chracaters instead of deleting), fix it by typing **stty erase** (backspace)
  
 ===== General weirdness ===== ===== General weirdness =====
  
-Oh yeah, there's some weirdness for sure. I'll update this once I determine what can be done about named. One thing: leave your domain unset, or set it to "nodomain". If it is "properly" set, it appends your domain to every lookup request for at least the ping utility. The file to edit is /etc/domain. You can unset your domain without a reboot by executing:+Oh yeah, there's some weirdness for sure. One thing: leave your domain unset, or set it to "nodomain". If it is "properly" set, it appends your domain to every lookup request for at least the ping utility. The file to edit is /etc/domain. You can unset your domain without a reboot by executing:
  
-domainname nodomain+**domainname nodomain**
  
  
networking.txt · Last modified: 2022/04/16 18:16 by wiki_admin